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Why does my 5 year old rock back and forth?


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#1 Brandi

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Posted 10 March 2006 - 03:27 PM

Maybe someone here can be some help to figure out why my child rocks back and forth. She has done this as a baby. I think this is how she deals with stress. My dh says it is just a habit. Of course, the teacher says it can be a form of autism. Her name is Callista and she is a very caring and bright child. My husband thinks we should stop her from doing it. But hey, why should we. We adult deal with our stress by taking medication or taking it out on other people. Shouldn't she be allow to cope with her own stress? Any ideas that maybe this isn't stress related?

Brandi

#2 melk

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Posted 10 March 2006 - 04:14 PM

Hi Brandi,
It can be a form of autism but I do this even now when I'm stressed and im 32. rocking seems to calm me.
Someone else may have a answer for you that is actually a answer. just thought I'd share that it could be stress related.
Cheers Mel

#3 Millie G

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Posted 10 March 2006 - 04:25 PM

Brandi

There are different versions of autism. There is Asperger's Syndrome which is a high functioning type of autism. That is what my grandson has. He is 8 years old today. They do not all have the same symptoms, but many do the rocking back and forth thing. They tend to be loving and bright, and that causes the parents to not realize the problem. When she is talking to you, does she tend to not look you in the eyes? They have trouble focussing on conversation if they are looking directly at you.
They have good family interaction but when they go to school, they start to have some issues. My grandson is uncomfortable in large crowds and loud noises upset him, but like I said, they do not all have the same symptoms. The rocking thing is definitely not a habit-it is a coping thing and she needs to do it. She also needs a proper diagnosis before she gets further involved in school because with the diagnosis, the school has to make certian accomodations. If she is not doing well or is unhappy in school, find out why. Not all schools work well with this but they will not tell you that. You need a psychiatrist who works with children and autism to get the right diagnosis.
My daughter-in-law was so upset when she was first told about his possible condition because she mistakenly thought it was related to retardation. Her only sibling is a severely retarded boy. Asperger's can be so mild that people grow up and do not know they have it but had difficulties all through school.
I hope this has been helpful and has not been upsetting to you. Do not let others pressure you into not checking into this, it is the child who ultimately pays for that.
Good luck,

Millie

"Things are not always as they seem"

#4 Shaun

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Posted 10 March 2006 - 04:50 PM

Hi Brandi:

From a practical perspective, Millie is right that you should have the child evaluated, particularly because the teacher suspects an autism like disorder.

Once you have such a diagnosis there will be funding for you, as well as college subsidies.

My intuitive impression, however, is that your daughter does not have anything within the autism spectrum. My feeling that when evaluated your daughter will have a mild form of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

I further feel she will outgrow this. I don't even feel it requires treatment.

My impression is that the rocking is a way to discharge energy and stress.

Still, a professional psychiatric evaluation is a good thing to have, a teacher may suspect autism spectrum disorder, but very few are qualified to diagnose it.

Your medical insurance in most cases will cover this evaluation if done by a psychiatrist.





Shaun

#5 Brandi

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Posted 10 March 2006 - 07:35 PM

They tend to be loving and bright, and that causes the parents to not realize the problem. When she is talking to you, does she tend to not look you in the eyes? They have trouble focussing on conversation if they are looking directly at you

Omg, that is my daughter to a T. She does wonderful in school, but she does have poor social skills. She loves school. I told my dh I think we should discuss this with her doctor, but he said "No" he does want her to be label and put in a special class. He feels if you tell someone they have a disorder, then sometimes they will not get better and continue to use that disorder as a excuss. But, I do not agree with him. When I was young I think I had some kind of autism. I had poor social skills and couldn't express myself. But my dad didn't want to knowlege something was wrong and I paid for it. I am the mother and I will do what I think is best wheater dh agrees or not. Thx for the advice and I will follow up with the dr about this.

Brandi

#6 Millie G

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Posted 10 March 2006 - 09:43 PM

Brandi

Boy does your husband sound like my son! It is a guy thing. Once the child is diagnosed and they find out the harm they are doing by not acknowledging it, they really come around.
Also, google Asperger's. Some websites have a lot of info, some are written by idiots. I saw one today that said they tend to have learning disabilities. No. They learn well, it is other things that tend to go along with it.
Aspergers and autism are really on the rise.
You are your child's best advocate. See to it that she gets what she needs.
And you know, she has that condition for a reason. It may be her life lesson, it may be your husband's or yours.
Please let us know how it goes.

Millie

"Things are not always as they seem"

#7 suzan

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Posted 11 March 2006 - 09:16 AM

Hi Brandi,

A friend of mine, has a child who Rocked back & Forth until he was at least 15. He said it relaxed and calmed him down!

Peace & Light,
Suzan:)

#8 Millie G

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Posted 11 March 2006 - 09:38 AM

Suzan

Your friend's child may well have had a mild case of Asperger's also. Unless you know what you are looking for, it is so easy to miss. They all seem to have some activity that they engage in the calms them. With my grandson, he cuts out strips of paper that he calls "dragons" and he goes off by himself and tells a whole story involving the dragons. Yesterday was his 8th birthday. Today is the party at Chuck E Cheese and he has been doing the dragons almost nonstop. It is how he copes with the excitement. If you do not allow them their activity, they have a meltdown.
They also tend to line things up. Matchbox cars would always be all lined up according to color. They also tend to have some subject that they get obsessive about. With Gavin, it was dinosaurs. He had a tememdous knowledge of them by time he went to kindergarden. And they are really good on the computer. He had his own when he was three.
And they tend to have only a couple of close friends. Their social skills outside of the family are not too good.
It is important that they get diagnosed while they are young. There is a lot that can help them.
And they tend to be psychic but do not want to discuss it.

Millie

"Things are not always as they seem"

#9 Shaun

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Posted 11 March 2006 - 12:03 PM

Hi Brandi

It is highly unlikely that you HAD autism, or asperger's syndrome.

Unlike ADHD, autism spectrum disorders are not fixable with drugs or counseling.

I would be suspect of a teacher who is claiming to be able to make this diagnosis without a professional evaluation.

Lack of eye contact could have numerous roots.

An inaccurate label of autism and aspergers could follow your child through life, affecting job propects and further alienating social connections.

One should be sure of this label before applying it to a child.




Shaun

#10 kindredspirit

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Posted 11 March 2006 - 01:28 PM

I would also recommend researching Indigo, Crystal and Rainbow children. They are often misdiagnosed with ADHD or ADD (Indigo) and Autism (Crystal). The author Doreen Virtue has many books and a CD set about it. They can be helped much more through undertanding, some dietary changes, etc than with medication.
I agree with Shaun, be very careful with labels. As an ex-psychiatric nurse my moto has always been "Label jars, not people"
Love and light,
kindredspirit

#11 Millie G

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Posted 11 March 2006 - 01:38 PM

Brandi

Something to consider. With autism, there is almost always food allergies and food sensitivities, and toxins. The toxins easily cross the brain barrier.

If my grandson were my son, I would have him on a strict diet that had no gluten-(the most common allergy for autism) and no junk food.
He would be taking supplements that have been shown to help autism-especially the oils. Sorry to say, my daughter-in-law does not share my enthusiasim for natural healing.

Brandi-you might want to start with googling the diet issue and nutritional defiencies common to this condition. It usually takes months to get that first appointment anyhow, so start with what you have control over. You never know...
Learn how to do muscle testing for allergies. Or see someone who knows how.

And as far as labels, many medical diagnoses result in some form of label. I am labeled diabetic. I could have avoided that label by not seeing the doctor and having the testing. Now I live with that label, and the knowledge of my condition and what to do about it.

Millie

"Things are not always as they seem"

#12 Broken Angel

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Posted 11 March 2006 - 02:25 PM

With my friend Kim (who's 27) , Judy Garland is her obsessive topic.

Converted Post said:

Originally posted by Millie G

Suzan

Your friend's child may well have had a mild case of Asperger's also. Unless you know what you are looking for, it is so easy to miss. They all seem to have some activity that they engage in the calms them. With my grandson, he cuts out strips of paper that he calls "dragons" and he goes off by himself and tells a whole story involving the dragons. Yesterday was his 8th birthday. Today is the party at Chuck E Cheese and he has been doing the dragons almost nonstop. It is how he copes with the excitement. If you do not allow them their activity, they have a meltdown.
They also tend to line things up. Matchbox cars would always be all lined up according to color. They also tend to have some subject that they get obsessive about. With Gavin, it was dinosaurs. He had a tememdous knowledge of them by time he went to kindergarden. And they are really good on the computer. He had his own when he was three.
And they tend to have only a couple of close friends. Their social skills outside of the family are not too good.
It is important that they get diagnosed while they are young. There is a lot that can help them.
And they tend to be psychic but do not want to discuss it.

Millie

"Things are not always as they seem"

Jamie
----------
"A woman is like a teabag-- don't know how strong she is until you put her in hot water.

#13 Shaun

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Posted 11 March 2006 - 02:35 PM

Hi Millie:

Diabetes or heart disease or other physical disorders do not carry the stigma of Aspergers or Autism or ADHD.

What I and others here are cautioning is that prior to assuming that such a condition exists, the child be evaluated by the appropriate professional. And, I would even suggest backing it up with at least one second opinion.

The label of Asperger's or autism, particularly carries a heavy stigma.

If correct, however, yes, it needs to be addressed.

If incorrect, this child's life will be adversely impacted, needlessly.



Shaun

#14 Millie G

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Posted 11 March 2006 - 02:55 PM

Shaun

"the child be evaluated by the appropriate professional."

I suggested that in my first reply above.

I know diabetes does not carry the same stigma. My point was that to avoid seeing a doctor and getting the testing because you want to avoid the label may also be keeping the child from getting the treatment she needs.

So she either (a) sees a doctor for a proper workup and diagnosis and possible label, or (:o do not see the doctor and never get labeled and never get treatment. Which is it that you are suggesting that she do?

The patient, or the parent in this case, always needs to do their own research and should not hesitate to speak up if something does not feel right. And of course, a second opinion is always good.

Millie

"Things are not always as they seem"

#15 Shaun

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Posted 11 March 2006 - 03:03 PM

Hi Mills:

Boy are you grumpy today?

It just seems that by suggesting treatment in your post, nutritional or otherwise, you are implying that the child definitely has asperger's or autism. At least it appears that way. I apologize if you did not mean it that way. Still it seems unclear.

I am only saying that such a label has serious consequences, and should be carefully considered and evaluated, prior to assuming anything or starting any type of treatment.

Shaun

#16 Brandi

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Posted 11 March 2006 - 03:13 PM

My only question is what is the treatment for it? Is there a treatment for it? Does the school system put you in a special class if you are diagnose with it? If so, that is pretty much telling the child there is something wrong with them. And if the child really didn't have it, they could start acting like the peers in there class because they are label as it. I could be wrong, these are my thoughts. This is something I think I need to do alot of research on. Btw, my child says she sees angles around and she can see them because she is special. Does autism kids have the ability to see spirits and such?

Brandi

#17 Millie G

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Posted 11 March 2006 - 03:32 PM

Brandi

My grandson started out having some classes in a special class but as they worked with him, he got moved into regular classes and now he is in all regular classes. The attitude of the teachers and their training means a lot. He does see a psychiatrist about every 3 months. The one here is great with kids, has a boy the same age as my grandson.

We have seen him sitting talking with spirits, but he won't discuss it. When he was 5 he sat out in the car for 45 minutes talking with them. He seemed so happy and excited. When I asked him about it, he said they are his friends but he would not say any more. So of course your daughter sees angels and of course she is special :o

As far as treatment goes, like I said, look into the food allergy thing, it causes a lot of toxins and affect this type of thing. Do your research-lots of it.

Millie

"Things are not always as they seem"

#18 Millie G

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Posted 11 March 2006 - 03:41 PM

Shaun

She did want to know what the treatment is should it turn out to be a diagnosis of a higher functioning autism.

You and I have gone through this before-disagreeing when we are actually both saying the same thing. Its like talking to my husband. :o

No I am not grumpy-I am going to a birthday party at Chuck E Cheese! :0) But it is damp and my mold allergy is making me feel like my head is full of cotton. [xx(]
It makes me somewhat nonfunctional.

Millie

"Things are not always as they seem"

#19 Brandi

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Posted 11 March 2006 - 03:42 PM

I will look into the food allergys. I think at this point I am going to have to do all the reseach I can on this. I have very little trust in doctors. Right now she is doing great in school, but she does seem to come home from school and take all her anger out on me. She is only in prek, so my guess is if she does have autism it will more inlikely get worst next year. So this might be a wait and see thing.

Brandi

#20 amethystdreams

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Posted 11 March 2006 - 03:59 PM

As a teacher of children with Aspergers and Autism, let me say that the "label" opens doors of opportunity for your children that are not available otherwise.
These children learn best with modifications of materials and environments. These children are "labelled" one way or the other because they engage in stereotypic behavior (such as rocking, hand flapping etc) and are made fun of, or are considered rude when they don't seem to grasp the social skills of their peer group or the adult world. So, in my mind, the label of being on the "spectrum" is BETTER for them in terms of being understood by and accepted by others in the world.
My class is in a regular elementary school and my children all attend regular elementary classes....with the modifications and support that are needed. I have educated every teacher and administrator in the school, and my children have "friends" at the level that they desire them. The other children in the school are aware of both the challenges and the GIFTS that my children possess and treat them just like every other child with the exception that they UNDERSTAND better what it is like to have that "label".
It is MY BELIEF that these children are more HIGHLY EVOLVED than we are. It's not that "they don't get us"....it's that "we don't get them". All of the children in my class have above average to near normal intelligence. They have taught ME more about life on this planet than any "typical" child ever has.
There are several diagnostic surveys that can be done to see if your child might need to be further evaluated...the CARS is but one of them.
These children are closer to spirit than to us at many levels.
And one of the best sites I ever saw was "oops wrong planet syndrome".

There are many many "successful" adults on the spectrum. Think of the nerdy, quiet, highly intelligent people that you know.......the "geeks".........who were made fun of and ostracized because they were misunderstood. The true geniuses who are very very often people who struggle with understanding humans but not data!

The oldest child in my class is an 8th grade honor student who won the Presidential Award last year.

There are many different levels of "success" in life. I call it being understood and cared for.....loved for who you are and what your gifts are. That is success in my book....with or without a label.

Amethystdreams




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